Causes of back pain

Back Pain or Back Spasms?

Are you suffering from back pain?

Does it feel like back spasms? 

Are your back spasms so intense you need a spine doctor?

Eighty percent of Americans will experience an episode of low back pain at some time in their lives[i] and about 31 million Americans are experiencing lower back pain at any given time.[ii] Back pain can happen at any time – while physically exerting your body or while lying in bed. Back pain is the most common reason for missed work accounting for more than 264 million lost work days in one year—that’s two work days for every full-time worker in the country.[iii]

A back spasm is the involuntary contraction or tensing of the muscles in the lower back. Back spasms range in severity, from infrequent spasms with mild discomfort to chronic spasms with severe pain that can make it difficult to move. There is no single mechanism that accounts for back spasms, but back strains—muscle/tendon/ligament tears—are the most common cause. A more serious cause is a bulging disc that presses against a nerve, causing the surrounding muscles to involuntarily contract.[iv] It’s important to talk with a medical professional about your specific experience with back pain in order to create a comprehensive treatment plan to manage or even eliminate back pain.

Chiropractic care in our case we call it spine therapy, offers a variety of ways to relieve back pain. At Divine Spine we offer a non-invasive, non-surgical option for relieving back pain with our Electronic Vertebral Alignment (EVA) system. The EVA system uses precise directed movement to help relieve pain and discomfort and restore range of motion in the spine.

EVA is a safe, non-invasive method that we use at Divine Spine in lieu of the controversial inversion therapy. Inversion therapy is a technique where one is suspended upside down to stretch the spine which in theory would relieve back pain. The idea is that by shifting the body’s gravity, pressure eases off the back while also providing traction for the spine. However, instead of increasing disk space, traction is more likely to stretch the muscles and ligaments around the spine and temporarily relieve muscle spasm. That may be why some people get short-term relief from back pain after lying on an inversion table.[v]

The most common risks associated with inversion tables are an unsafe rise in blood pressure, a rise in pressure in the eyes (glaucoma), or a rise in heart rate.[vi],[vii] For these reasons, inversion therapy is not safe for those with high blood pressure, heart disease or glaucoma.[viii] It’s not only unsafe for some people, but it does not offer lasting relief from back pain. Well-designed studies evaluating spinal traction have found the technique ineffective for long-term relief.[ix]

On the other hand, EVA can be used safely to reduce the need for pain medication and even surgery. It is gentle and precise. This method is designed to achieve maximum safety and comfort while being highly effective.

A back spasm can occur any time; sometimes it strikes when you’re exercising and physically exerting your body and other times you may be resting or even lying down. If you experience recurring or worsening back spasms, there’s no reason to resign yourself to a lifetime of back pain. At Divine Spine we can help determine if our electronic vertebral alignment system may be a safe option for your pain relief. Many people with back pain can benefit from the skilled services of a chiropractor– come find out if EVA is right for you. Make an appointment with us HERE

 

 

[i] http://www.med.unc.edu/www/newsarchive/2009/february/chronic-low-back-pain-on-the-rise-unc-study-finds-alarming-increase-in-prevalence

[ii]Jensen M, Brant-Zawadzki M, Obuchowski N, et al. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Lumbar Spine in People Without Back Pain. N Engl J Med 1994; 331: 69-116.

[iii] The Hidden Impact of Musculoskeletal Disorders on Americans, United State Bone and Joint Initiative, 2018.

[iv] https://universityhealthnews.com/daily/pain/back-spasms/

[v] https://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletter_article/do-inversion-tables-work

[vi] https://www.verywellhealth.com/does-an-inversion-table-help-low-back-pain-2696277

[vii] https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/back-pain/expert-answers/inversion-therapy/faq-20057951

[viii] https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/back-pain/expert-answers/inversion-therapy/faq-20057951

[ix] https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/back-pain/expert-answers/inversion-therapy/faq-20057951